Harry Brown Imdb

Harry Brown Imdb Filmography

Harry Brown. Von Null Uhr Eins bis Mitternacht - Der abenteuerliche Urlaub des Mark Lissen (TV Series). - Die Geschichte der schönen Gräfin (). Hannes Tannert Thomas Brown. Beryl Sharland Mildred Watson Brown. Wolfgang Eger Harry Brown. Harald Dietl Mike Patrick. Ursula van der Wielen. Harry Wüstenhagen, Actor: Der grüne Bogenschütze. Harry Wüstenhagen was born on January 11, in Berlin, Germany as George Randolph Brown. Phil Brown, Actor: Harry. Phil Brown is an actor, known for Harry (), The Market () and American Playboy: The Hugh Hefner Story (). Karamo Brown's LGBTQIA and Racial Justice Picks · The IMDb Harry. Jenny (TV Movie) Otto. Die unheilige Sophia (TV Movie). Egmont (TV​.

Harry Brown Imdb

Das verrückteste Auto der Welt Mr. Brown I Das Glück läuft hinterher. Harry Abt. Unterm Birnbaum (TV Movie) Orth. Three Penny Opera. Karamo Brown's LGBTQIA and Racial Justice Picks · The IMDb Show () Harry Ehrenstein. - Siebzehn Jahr () Harry Ehrenstein. Werner - Das​. Harry Brown. ()IMDb h 42minX-Ray. Michael Caine returns to the vengeance-fuelled chills of GET CARTER for this contemporary thriller in which.

Harry Brown Imdb Video

HARRY BROWN - "You failed to maintain your weapon, son"

Filmography by Job Trailers and Videos. Share this page:. The Best Actresses and Actors - Born in the s.

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Known For. Marine Raiders Cook. Shoot to Kill Jim Forman. Ringside Fight Manager. Our Daily Bread Little Man.

Jump to: Actor Soundtrack. Jelks as W. Harry Brown. Dunn - The Joe Iris Story Dunn as Harris Brown. Pianist uncredited.

Brown is distraught over this already he's been all alone since his wife just died and a daughter died many years before, perhaps during childbirth or as a child , and knows the cops won't do much about it despite doing some investigations.

So, Brown takes his skills as a former Marine, before facing off against the Northern Irish years before, and uses it to exact payback.

Immediately moviegoers will flash to Gran Torino, as a story of a lonely, grumpy old man mixing it up with gang-bangers in a part of town he should have moved out of.

But it actually owes more to Taxi Driver in some part- an ex-Marine wiping "the scum off the streets"- and of course Charles Bronson in Death Wish.

But as Michael Caine points out in interviews, there was a certain underlying joy Bronson had with his character of Paul Kersey in the Death Wish movies, even in the first one which was most gritty.

This film, about the horror of gang violence and drugs and prostitution as an everyday occurrence, really hits the spot far better than the shots of gang-bangers in Eastwood's film.

In fact, I would go as far as to say Harry Brown trumps Gran Torino in the department of being about "something" Torino about racism, Brown about vigilantism.

And at the center of a film directed with an artful, patient eye by newcomer Daniel Barber, and written with wisdom and tough attitude when it needs to be by Gary Young, is Michael Caine's performance.

He's so good in a film like this because we believe this is Harry Brown, or what he might be like, and we can see ourselves in a part of Brown due to Caine's sympathy or even empathy with the character.

This is a man of reserve, but also resolve, and when he takes to the streets it's because it's really a last resort, a kind of fight for survival as well as revenge, and Caine doesn't hold back when Brown needs to shed some tears, or to have that fierceness in his eyes against these young punks.

One such scene, which I'll not soon forget, is after he plugs a bullet into the gut of a junkie dumbass who tries to pull a gun on Brown as he's purchasing a few weapons, and tells a story about a fellow officer he was fighting alongside who had to die in the trenches because of a lack of medical care.

It's one of the best scenes I've ever seen with Caine in it, and overall the film provides him the opportunity for another piece of superb work.

But this is so small a flaw that it's hard to judge the film against it. Harry Brown takes its subject matter by the throat, treats it cinematically with care, and when it's violent you get shaken up and when Brown is in the shadows one suddenly wonders why Caine didn't play Batman in Nolan's movies.

A serious near-classic on street violence and revenge. CinemaAddict 28 November To start with, much credit must be given to the director and the cast for this dramatic masterpiece.

All the actors, be it the talented Michael Caine or the younger members representing the gang, delivered an excellent performance contributing to the disturbing realism this film was able to achieve.

Combined with the perfect soundtrack, this film addresses the very contemporary issues that are violence and injustice in our supposedly civilised nations.

Unlike Banlieue 13 which used the same kind of context to produce a superfluous action flick, or Gran Torino which confronts the issue from the perspective of racism, the realism of Harry Brown cannot but make us aware of our flawed individualistic society.

This film depicts the destructive environment in which the unfortunate many attempt to survive the anger, the fear and the injustice which inevitably feed the criminality plaguing our "evolved" world.

Not only is this film Oscar worthy, but most importantly, worth your while. If you enjoy good cinema and a good philosophical debate, then you will most definitively appreciate this genuine perspective on humanity!

The movie is set in The Elephant and Castle where I, as a 17 year old, went to a strip joint in a well dodgy pub during a visit to London.

If I'd have seen this film beforehand I'd not have gone within a mile of the area, never mind into its seedy interior.

Apparently Michael Caine is from "The Elephant" so this was probably quite a nostalgic road trip for him. In the movie he plays a vigilante gradually becoming more and more determined to avenge the brutal murder of his old mate fast on the heels of his wife's death at the hands of a bunch of local scum who terrorise the neighbourhood.

This is no ordinary vigilante movie and, although I haven't seen it, it must bear considerable comparison to Grand Torino where another fine actor in his latter years dominates a movie.

The casting is wonderful and the thugs that terrify the local community are entirely believable. But from start to finish this is Caine's movie.

He plays his part with massive pathos. We feel deeply sorry for him as, first, his wife and, then, his only chum pass away leaving him quietly tormented and then incredibly angry as he learns that his mates death was mockingly filmed on a mobile phone to the accompaniment of raucous laughter.

The brutality of this movie is searing and really shocking at times. The riot scene is entirely believable, which is difficult to achieve on a low budget but certainly hits the spot.

It plays an important central role in undermining the police and showing them off as the useless and uncaring force that director, Daniel Barber is keen to establish.

Two things make this movie a real stand out; Caine and the pacing of the action. It starts brutally slowly and gradually winds up in pace and tension but never to Hollywood proportions.

Don't forget that Caine is a pensioner! Amazingly it holds your belief throughout - not an inconsiderable achievement in a genre that tends to become overblown and ridiculous.

He might even win because his performance is stunning. I certainly hope so. His best performance? A great film? This is a thought-provoking and sightly harrowing insight into a slice of society that we are all aware of, but choose to turn away from.

Michael Caine is convincing as Harry Brown, who represents the post-war generation. His smart suit and mild manners are in stark contrast to the hoodie thugs that stalk the estate.

However Harry Brown is a man with a hidden past and it transpires that that he is much tougher then all the estate scumbags combined.

This creates the very essence of why this film is so compelling. He completely turns the tables on these individuals who have installed a sense of fear into the weaker members of society, who are depicted as women and the elderly in the film.

This film will make you squirm in your seat. In particular the scene with the drug dealers, where Harry enters their grim and seedy world for the first time.

As a viewer you feel a real sense of disgust for these individuals who spend all their days off their faces, whilst living in complete filth and using women like their sex objects.

The film also draws interesting comparsions between the police and 'old school' Harry Brown. While Harry goes in undercover and creams off the ringleaders discreetly and effectively, the police charge in like thugs themselves and create a war-zone that they are powerless to fight against.

This is a film that will linger in the mind long after viewing and is very troubling as it reflects a very harsh and grim reality. If you enjoy gritty and sociological dramas, this is well worth a watch.

It will be said by many that this is predictable and shallow on plot or sub-plot and this would be true.

What this film does, however, is take Grand Torino and turn it into the film it should have been, could have been, ought to have been.

This is no Death Wish movie. It is the story of a man driven to the absolute end of his tether by events. You can feel the emotion in Caine's performance, something that I would say is lacking in many of his performances, and is therefore lifted.

This is not Rambo or Commando, where a retired army dude ripped to the hilt dons his gear one last time.

It is an old man doing what can be done and surprising himself, I think. It is a dark film supported by a very well acted cast.

The gang members feel real. One or two unanswered questions which you would expect but overall a great effort. Solid film that needed more in the way of intelligence and comment in the script bob the moo 30 December The video included clips from Harry Brown and it reminded me this film existed since it has slipped away in my mind.

So, back in my mind, I decided to watch it despite only having heard so-so things about it. The end result of this was for me to have those so-so things confirmed because it is a film that kind-of does a job in terms of being a solid watch but at the same time doesn't really perform any other function or have anything specific to make it particularly worth seeing.

The plot in a nutshell is that a pensioner seeks revenge on the drug gangs running his estate when they kill a friend of his.

So essentially we are in Death Wish territory although I was curious to see if the film celebrated vigilante violence, whether it condemned it or whether it used the thriller plot to make comments on the state of modern Britain and such forgotten estates.

Strangely it doesn't really do any of these and mostly it just plays as a straight thriller. As such it is perfectly watchable with excessive violence, some tense scenes and a generally well created world of a police no-go area.

It is not brilliant by any means but it is fine for what it is. It does all get overblown towards the end and I found it a little too over the top to take seriously, but it is what it is.

The lack of anything else going on was a problem for me though. It wasn't that I needed it to take a stand on anything, I just wanted it to be a bit smarter and more interesting than it was.

The film doesn't have much to say about anything though; not about society, not about crime, not about policing and not about justice.

Of course the film doesn't owe me anything like that nor does it have to have any comment when it is content to just be a drama — it just needed to be a better, more engaging drama to make up for it.

Caine is the main appeal and he does hold the screen in this role. His performance is good and it did make me wish the material had given him more to work with in terms of substance.

He is a great presence but he is lost in the overblown final third and really deserved a tighter focus on his character.

Mortimer has little to do other than be the face of the powerless police while the majority of the cast turn in rather easy "gangster youth" performances although the main ones do have a bit more about them than that.

Plan B has done this sort of thing before and he is OK but his character is too simple — compared to the content of his first album it is far too one dimensional but he is solid enough doing it.

It is enjoyably mean even if it does just what you expect this sort of story to do. I would have liked at least something in the way of comment or intelligence in the material though, but if it is there it doesn't come through.

Not only would this have made the film better but it would have been good for the cast as well. Solid, but no more than that.

This is the known story of a man become into vigilante. An elderly ex-serviceman and widower , Harry Brown , Michael Caine looks to avenge his best friend David Bradley 's murder by doling out his own form of justice.

As a retired man turned vigilante and taking the law into his own hands as judge , jury and executioner. As every man has a breaking point.

Harry turns the one-man vigilante when his friend is attacked , beaten and then stabbed to death in an underground passage carried out by furious band formed by some ominous punks.

Then he stalks the slums of London and takes the law into his own hands, searching vengeance on crooks, hoodlums, druggies , muggers, pimps , making the neighborhood safer and bumping off delinquents and street scum.

Meanwhile , police officers D. Alice Frampton Emily Mortimer and D. Terry Hicock Charlie Creed-Miles are investigating the deeds and Police Superintendent Childs Iain Glen orders a major arrest operation believing the recent violence is related to a gang war.

The late-night raids on the neighbourhood result in a massive riot. This interesting picture has suspense , emotion , intrigue , thrills and lots of violence.

It's certainly thrilling , though the morality may be questionable , even in this time, as the spectators were clearly on the Harry Brown's side.

Michael Caine saw a lot of himself in the character of Harry Brown, e. To herald Harry Brown as a film that every person should see is a watershed moment for the way the UK likes to portray itself.

When I was younger, I was told about what's good and bad, right and wrong and perhaps more importantly, how to deal with injustice and how not to turn a blind eye to it.

Only last week, a film with similar 'citizen turns vigilante against thugs' was banned from cinema screens in its home city of Nottingham for fear of a violent backlash and reprisals, such was the brutal, yet unsparing depiction of Nottingham's gang culture.

And the difference between that and Harry Brown is? Earlier this year, I had the honour seeing the debut film of a largely unknown award-winning filmmaker based in Stratford - the home of the Olympics - the shiny side of London.

Stick with Me directed by Bernard Kordieh is an uncompromising tale about brotherhood, confronting the viewer with the brutal reality of life in London's inner cities — very much in the mould of Harry Brown.

Judging by the hype surrounding Harry Brown and the record attendance who saw Stick with Me make its' premiere at the British Urban Film Festival last month, what is clear is that Harry Brown and similar films has a far more prominent role to play in public life, making us all think about what our roles as citizens are.

Simply put, Harry Brown is very much a film which does exactly what it says on the tin and Sir Michael is magnificent.

Watched this at a London preview screening This is an enjoyable, and often tense vigilante film. But don't look for a radical plot line or unpredictable twists because this is simply a straight forward and predictable Death Wish style vigilante story.

I'll give absolutely no credit to the screenplay writer for that. But full marks to the director for turning up the high tensions to make this still an exciting film.

Having lived in a council estate myself, I know how frightening some youngsters are and can be more terrifying than the recent flurry of zombie films.

However, this is Michael Caine's show and is a fine addition to the recent surge of old tough guys fighting back movies such as Gran Torino.

Caine was brilliant as usual. He makes the most of a pitifully typical script. That is of a widower seeking violent vengeance on the youths who killed his friend.

He played it subtle and his vigilante transition was done just right. He isn't turned into some unrealistic slick killing machine or a Rambo.

He has typical elderly obstacles such as breathing problems, slow reflexes and old bones but some of his military skills give him a chance.

There is a also a sub plot involving a female detective on his trail but it so underwritten, I just didn't care. The actors playing the youths were very very convincing and help to root for our pensioner hero even more.

So it is satisfying to see our legendary cockney actor clean up some really nasty bad guys. Saw this film last night and wanted to applaud the British film-makers for producing this great film.

It is a film which made me literally jump from my seat with excellent filmotography. I feel this is a film well worth watching and as mentioned in the trailers, it has to be the best British film of the year.

I do not think any more British releases will be able to compete with this film. Michael Caine's acting is as usual superb and he has once again showed his professionalism in a different way.

To describe this movie as a vigilante thriller is correct but woefully inadequate because what it also does so well is to portray, with some poignancy, the sadness and despondency of an old man's life and the helplessness of the residents of an estate which is controlled by gangs who trade in violence and drugs on a daily basis.

The presence of a deteriorating council estate, a pedestrian underpass which ordinary people have to avoid for their own safety and drug deals being done without any attempt at discretion, are all too realistic, as are the random outbursts of violence which frequently target those least able to protect themselves young mothers, old people etc.

First-time director Daniel Barber's use of hand-held cameras and editing make some of the action sequences very compelling and the considered pacing of the early part of the film is successful in enabling Harry Brown's lifestyle and character to be introduced in a way which is both simple and effective.

The atmosphere of the piece is grim, bleak and pessimistic and the impressive night-time scenes play an important part in contributing to the overall mood.

Harry Brown Michael Caine is an elderly ex-marine who lives a lonely life in a decaying council estate in London.

After suffering the loss of his wife who'd been in a coma for some time, he plays chess with his best friend Len David Bradley at his local pub.

Len tells Harry about the harassment he's been suffering from the youths who post dog-droppings and lit newspapers through his letter box and describes how fearful the experience has made him feel.

He shows Harry a bayonet that he carries to protect himself and his desperation has been made worse by the fact that the police are unable to provide him with any form of help or protection.

Harry's alarmed by what Len tells him and advises him not to take matters into his own hands. A short time later, Detective Alice Frampton Emily Mortimer visits Harry and informs him that Len has been killed by one of the local gangs and then, on a second visit adds that it might not be possible to make a murder charge stick because the gang could argue that they acted in self-defence as Len was carrying his bayonet.

The police interview some gang members including their leader, Noel Winters Ben Drew , but soon have to release them again. Following Len's funeral, Harry's threatened at knife-point by a thug who tries to rob him.

In this moment, his old marine training kicks in and he kills his assailant. This is a significant turning point because since he'd completed his military service in Northern Ireland, Harry had kept his most distasteful memories buried deep inside him.

The sudden resurrection of his old skills and instincts then leads to him following a violent course of action to avenge his friend's murder.

In a movie that's full of good acting performances, the surprise package for most people is Ben Drew better known as Plan B who is brilliant as the detestable gang leader who exemplifies perfectly the way that most people see thugs like Noel Winters.

This character's only aspiration is to emulate the notoriety previously achieved by his father. He's also completely devoid of any decency, respect or concern for the victims of his actions.

Drew, who has achieved great success in the past with his soulful Smokey-esque vocals and biting political hip hop offerings has also made forays into screen writing and directing and is clearly an important emerging talent.

Emily Mortimer is very credible in her role as a police officer who is sensitive and much more tuned-in to what's going on than her superiors.

The way in which she conveys the hopelessness and weariness that she feels is quietly powerful and consistent with the overall atmosphere of the film.

Michael Caine is incredibly natural and straightforward in the way that he brings to life Harry's innate decency and dignity.

He's also very subtle in conveying the anxiety and frustration that Harry feels as well as the resigned way in which he views the pointless violence that only makes the poor conditions on his estate even more desperate.

It is not hard to find shook stories in the British media about youth violence, youth crime and the hoodie menace; particularly in the estates of London and there is some truth about gang culture and sink estates.

Harry Brown is a film that takes on this subject in what was dubbed the British Gran Torino. Gangs run the streets, attacking people, robbing vehicles, shooting guns, taking drugs and making live Hell for the residents.

His oldest friend Leonard David Bradley can not take it any more and since he had no support from the police he goes to confront the gang and ends up gets killed for his troubles.

Harry Brown was Daniel Barber's feature debut and he shows that he is a very skilled director. He was able make a very compelling, fast paced revenge thriller in a gritty urban setting.

The violence felt real, with shooting being very bloody. Barber did not hold back showing the horrors of this kind of world, with innocent people being randomly attacked, including shooting a woman pushing a pram though I would have thought the police would put a lot of man power into that investigate.

The gang is shown to willing to act sexually to work, such as grabbing a woman and pushing their hips towards hers. There are chilling moments, like when Noel is with a young girl and tightens her scarf around her neck.

Barber uses mobile phone cameras and camcorders for short periods to give an added scene of realism and show what the gangs would have seen.

The police raid and riot was also really well make, quickly smashing into flats and the whole of the youth of the estate throwing anything they could at the police.

Harry Brown is meant to be Michael Caine's last starring role in a film and it was an incredible performance.

He was able to show his range and determination in a film about a man who had lost everything and wants to set everything right.

Considering the story is pretty standard, Caine and Barber did an incredible job. Emily Mortimer is one of those actresses who does give her all in a film and she was interesting as a committed, but kind officer who does care about people: though some hints about her past would have added a little depth.

Ben Drew shows a lot of promise as an actor being a sinister little thug and he was truly unlikeable person, with a mum who would defence him to hilted.

Bradley was able very believable as a man who had suffered for a long time and it really did look like he was a long time friend of Harry.

Whilst overall the film is excellent, some elements of the plot reminded me the Tom Clancy novel Without Remorse, about an ex-military guy getting revenge against a gang to gain revenge.

It follows a similar route, of a man killing and torturing way to the true and being as ruthless as possible. This is a film that does a have a right wing tone how the police has failed, that people can take justice into their own hands and that the majority of kids living on an estate are violence drug dealers who have fun tormenting people.

I do believe it is true that the police can be hopeless dealing with unsocial behaviour, thinking it is not worth their time or say they can not do anything, say for a lack of evidence: there are a number of shock stories in the media about that, so Harry Brown does have a valid point there.

But this a film that takes all the hoodie stereotypes and pushes them to their extremes: I would have thought the police would have taken action because of the violence.

Also Harry Brown certainly wanted to make a effort sure the bad guys were as unlikeable as possible, like a leading drug running forcing a hoodie to perform oral sex.

Overall I personally think Harry Brown is a better film then Gran Torino because Harry took a more proactive route and he nothing to loose.

He was a character more willing to use violence and did not have to take on an issue like racism. So Sad mmunier 22 October I saw this last night and found it a stirring experience.

I believe it although aware it was a movie. I'm close to 70 years old and had to take this on board as such. I believe such areas exist and I find it frightening bordering to paranoia.

I often hate undue violence and extreme language in cinema, Yet here I did not mind it because I believed this was real. I did not mention anger above, but it certainly was part of my emotion during viewing anger but also hopelessness and helplessness.

That right, not everyone is an ex marine or has the character to go through H. B's motion, but we're all exposed to home violent home invasion or other violent event.

Perhaps the chance of this happening may equate to winning the lottery, but the media and the 7th art have a filled day with it.

Yet it is real and it's a hard task to know if one should bury one's head in the sand and pretend this does not exist or to think one can look after one's self and be able to stand the heat where ever it is.

Just as to evaluate if this side of society should be portrayed with positive result or the reverse.

I think thugs will always see themselves as heroes in such movies even if they end up with the bad result. As for others they may want the vigilante side of it with possibly dire consequence.

Death Wish I have not seen, and G.

Of Mice and Men premiere. Silent Directors. Gone with the Wind LA premiere. Oscar Legends: The Complete Collection. Do you have a demo reel?

Add it to your IMDbPage. How Much Have You Seen? How much of Harry Joe Brown's work have you seen? Known For. The Winner Producer.

Broadway Billy Producer. Lucky Larkin Producer. Gun Gospel Producer. Crossroads TV Series producer - 27 episodes, - executive producer - 14 episodes, - - The Healing Show all 41 episodes.

Alternate Names: Harry J. Harry is informed by the police of this incident and it hurts him terribly, telling the police that they are powerless to do anything about it.

Slowly and almost imperceptibly, Harry snaps and decides that he is going to sort it out the old fashioned way.

It is obvious that this film owes much to Michael Winners "Death Wish" but this story is so much more bleak and depressing.

The young actors who play the gang members are so realistic that they are uncomfortable to watch. The story shows you failings in society at every level and a police division run by a superintendent who is content to put up token resistance and little else.

Harry Brown does what most people would like to do deep down inside and take the fight to the criminals. Michael Caine does a great job of getting the best out of a poor script that doesn't give enough dialogue to flesh out the characters properly.

He makes the transition from pensioner to vigilante credibly and without becoming a totally different character. The limited sets add an effective touch of claustrophobia but I found the unrelenting depictions of sleaze and urban decay a bit tough to take.

There are some very uncomfortable scenes of drug use and violence also, particularly the climactic shoot out in the pub.

The supporting cast are competent enough with Ben Drew standing out in his role as the particularly nasty young scum bag "Noel".

Emily Mortimer as DI Frampton is fairly inert and has only one facial expression and a vague attitude throughout the whole film which puts you off feeling much for her character.

Harry spends most of his days going to visit his very ill wife Kath Liz Daniels and playing chess with his best friend Leonard Attwell David Bradley.

Harry and Leonard live on an estate in London which is becoming plagued by the now common youth gang culture.

Sadly Harry's wife Kath passes away and all harry has left is Leonard. Leonard tells Harry that he is being harassed and abused by the local gang, to which Harry begs his friend to take this to the police.

Leonard also tells harry that he is carrying a bayonet in order to use as protection for his life. One evening Leonard goes to confront the gang in an underpass as is sadly shot and killed.

The police can not prosecute as the court would rule self defence by the shooter. Harry, who is now very emotionally upset and frustrated by the polices lack of help decides that justice must be served and he takes matters into his own hands.

Obtaining a firearm he goes on a one man vigilante spree to rid his estate of the vile pest of the local gang. My verdict - Follow the explosive and emotionally charged scenes packed so tightly into this wonderful film.

You will be saddened, horrified and then brought into a sense of reality that the gang culture problem is portrayed to the truth in this film.

I found myself feeling so emotional that a group of youths would kill an elderly man point blank. Michael Caine portrays Harry Brown with sheer class and pure personality.

His acting ability never ceases to amaze. The story and screenplay are explosive and full of emotion, courage and heroism.

I beg everyone to watch this film and see how gang culture can ruin a community. Daniel Barber, so far I have never heard of this director which is normal, this is his first major flick.

And what a great movie this is. It's funny that I as a horror geek was recommended Harry Brown.

But I didn't regret it watching it and I must even say that I got goosebumps by some scene's. And people who know me do know that I can take the goriest pieces without a problem.

But again, it is really the reality and the brutality that makes the movie and of course Sir Michael Caine.

His acting is surely an Oscar worthy. But also worth mentioning is Sean Harris. This is an all points an excellent movie.

Not in Rambo or Arnie style with a lot of shooting but just a straight in your face flick, big thumbs up to the director, Sir Caine and the whole bunch involved.

Quinoa 21 May Harry Brown is a pensioner, and former Marine, living in a very run-down apartment complex or is it flat in the urban quarter of London.

It's a crappy place to be; kids ling their drugs and guns, and beat up those who happen to venture just a little far out into the path.

One of those is Harry's friend, Leonard Atwell, who tries to defend himself against the scum on the streets and winds up stabbed with his own knife.

Brown is distraught over this already he's been all alone since his wife just died and a daughter died many years before, perhaps during childbirth or as a child , and knows the cops won't do much about it despite doing some investigations.

So, Brown takes his skills as a former Marine, before facing off against the Northern Irish years before, and uses it to exact payback. Immediately moviegoers will flash to Gran Torino, as a story of a lonely, grumpy old man mixing it up with gang-bangers in a part of town he should have moved out of.

But it actually owes more to Taxi Driver in some part- an ex-Marine wiping "the scum off the streets"- and of course Charles Bronson in Death Wish.

But as Michael Caine points out in interviews, there was a certain underlying joy Bronson had with his character of Paul Kersey in the Death Wish movies, even in the first one which was most gritty.

This film, about the horror of gang violence and drugs and prostitution as an everyday occurrence, really hits the spot far better than the shots of gang-bangers in Eastwood's film.

In fact, I would go as far as to say Harry Brown trumps Gran Torino in the department of being about "something" Torino about racism, Brown about vigilantism.

And at the center of a film directed with an artful, patient eye by newcomer Daniel Barber, and written with wisdom and tough attitude when it needs to be by Gary Young, is Michael Caine's performance.

He's so good in a film like this because we believe this is Harry Brown, or what he might be like, and we can see ourselves in a part of Brown due to Caine's sympathy or even empathy with the character.

This is a man of reserve, but also resolve, and when he takes to the streets it's because it's really a last resort, a kind of fight for survival as well as revenge, and Caine doesn't hold back when Brown needs to shed some tears, or to have that fierceness in his eyes against these young punks.

One such scene, which I'll not soon forget, is after he plugs a bullet into the gut of a junkie dumbass who tries to pull a gun on Brown as he's purchasing a few weapons, and tells a story about a fellow officer he was fighting alongside who had to die in the trenches because of a lack of medical care.

It's one of the best scenes I've ever seen with Caine in it, and overall the film provides him the opportunity for another piece of superb work.

But this is so small a flaw that it's hard to judge the film against it. Harry Brown takes its subject matter by the throat, treats it cinematically with care, and when it's violent you get shaken up and when Brown is in the shadows one suddenly wonders why Caine didn't play Batman in Nolan's movies.

A serious near-classic on street violence and revenge. CinemaAddict 28 November To start with, much credit must be given to the director and the cast for this dramatic masterpiece.

All the actors, be it the talented Michael Caine or the younger members representing the gang, delivered an excellent performance contributing to the disturbing realism this film was able to achieve.

Combined with the perfect soundtrack, this film addresses the very contemporary issues that are violence and injustice in our supposedly civilised nations.

Unlike Banlieue 13 which used the same kind of context to produce a superfluous action flick, or Gran Torino which confronts the issue from the perspective of racism, the realism of Harry Brown cannot but make us aware of our flawed individualistic society.

This film depicts the destructive environment in which the unfortunate many attempt to survive the anger, the fear and the injustice which inevitably feed the criminality plaguing our "evolved" world.

Not only is this film Oscar worthy, but most importantly, worth your while. If you enjoy good cinema and a good philosophical debate, then you will most definitively appreciate this genuine perspective on humanity!

The movie is set in The Elephant and Castle where I, as a 17 year old, went to a strip joint in a well dodgy pub during a visit to London.

If I'd have seen this film beforehand I'd not have gone within a mile of the area, never mind into its seedy interior.

Apparently Michael Caine is from "The Elephant" so this was probably quite a nostalgic road trip for him. In the movie he plays a vigilante gradually becoming more and more determined to avenge the brutal murder of his old mate fast on the heels of his wife's death at the hands of a bunch of local scum who terrorise the neighbourhood.

This is no ordinary vigilante movie and, although I haven't seen it, it must bear considerable comparison to Grand Torino where another fine actor in his latter years dominates a movie.

The casting is wonderful and the thugs that terrify the local community are entirely believable. But from start to finish this is Caine's movie.

He plays his part with massive pathos. We feel deeply sorry for him as, first, his wife and, then, his only chum pass away leaving him quietly tormented and then incredibly angry as he learns that his mates death was mockingly filmed on a mobile phone to the accompaniment of raucous laughter.

The brutality of this movie is searing and really shocking at times. The riot scene is entirely believable, which is difficult to achieve on a low budget but certainly hits the spot.

It plays an important central role in undermining the police and showing them off as the useless and uncaring force that director, Daniel Barber is keen to establish.

Two things make this movie a real stand out; Caine and the pacing of the action. It starts brutally slowly and gradually winds up in pace and tension but never to Hollywood proportions.

Don't forget that Caine is a pensioner! Amazingly it holds your belief throughout - not an inconsiderable achievement in a genre that tends to become overblown and ridiculous.

He might even win because his performance is stunning. I certainly hope so. His best performance? A great film? This is a thought-provoking and sightly harrowing insight into a slice of society that we are all aware of, but choose to turn away from.

Michael Caine is convincing as Harry Brown, who represents the post-war generation. His smart suit and mild manners are in stark contrast to the hoodie thugs that stalk the estate.

However Harry Brown is a man with a hidden past and it transpires that that he is much tougher then all the estate scumbags combined.

This creates the very essence of why this film is so compelling. He completely turns the tables on these individuals who have installed a sense of fear into the weaker members of society, who are depicted as women and the elderly in the film.

This film will make you squirm in your seat. In particular the scene with the drug dealers, where Harry enters their grim and seedy world for the first time.

As a viewer you feel a real sense of disgust for these individuals who spend all their days off their faces, whilst living in complete filth and using women like their sex objects.

The film also draws interesting comparsions between the police and 'old school' Harry Brown. While Harry goes in undercover and creams off the ringleaders discreetly and effectively, the police charge in like thugs themselves and create a war-zone that they are powerless to fight against.

This is a film that will linger in the mind long after viewing and is very troubling as it reflects a very harsh and grim reality.

If you enjoy gritty and sociological dramas, this is well worth a watch. It will be said by many that this is predictable and shallow on plot or sub-plot and this would be true.

What this film does, however, is take Grand Torino and turn it into the film it should have been, could have been, ought to have been. This is no Death Wish movie.

It is the story of a man driven to the absolute end of his tether by events. You can feel the emotion in Caine's performance, something that I would say is lacking in many of his performances, and is therefore lifted.

This is not Rambo or Commando, where a retired army dude ripped to the hilt dons his gear one last time.

It is an old man doing what can be done and surprising himself, I think. It is a dark film supported by a very well acted cast.

The gang members feel real. One or two unanswered questions which you would expect but overall a great effort. Solid film that needed more in the way of intelligence and comment in the script bob the moo 30 December The video included clips from Harry Brown and it reminded me this film existed since it has slipped away in my mind.

So, back in my mind, I decided to watch it despite only having heard so-so things about it. The end result of this was for me to have those so-so things confirmed because it is a film that kind-of does a job in terms of being a solid watch but at the same time doesn't really perform any other function or have anything specific to make it particularly worth seeing.

The plot in a nutshell is that a pensioner seeks revenge on the drug gangs running his estate when they kill a friend of his. So essentially we are in Death Wish territory although I was curious to see if the film celebrated vigilante violence, whether it condemned it or whether it used the thriller plot to make comments on the state of modern Britain and such forgotten estates.

Strangely it doesn't really do any of these and mostly it just plays as a straight thriller. As such it is perfectly watchable with excessive violence, some tense scenes and a generally well created world of a police no-go area.

It is not brilliant by any means but it is fine for what it is. It does all get overblown towards the end and I found it a little too over the top to take seriously, but it is what it is.

The lack of anything else going on was a problem for me though. It wasn't that I needed it to take a stand on anything, I just wanted it to be a bit smarter and more interesting than it was.

The film doesn't have much to say about anything though; not about society, not about crime, not about policing and not about justice.

Of course the film doesn't owe me anything like that nor does it have to have any comment when it is content to just be a drama — it just needed to be a better, more engaging drama to make up for it.

Caine is the main appeal and he does hold the screen in this role. His performance is good and it did make me wish the material had given him more to work with in terms of substance.

He is a great presence but he is lost in the overblown final third and really deserved a tighter focus on his character. Mortimer has little to do other than be the face of the powerless police while the majority of the cast turn in rather easy "gangster youth" performances although the main ones do have a bit more about them than that.

Plan B has done this sort of thing before and he is OK but his character is too simple — compared to the content of his first album it is far too one dimensional but he is solid enough doing it.

It is enjoyably mean even if it does just what you expect this sort of story to do. I would have liked at least something in the way of comment or intelligence in the material though, but if it is there it doesn't come through.

Not only would this have made the film better but it would have been good for the cast as well. Solid, but no more than that.

This is the known story of a man become into vigilante. An elderly ex-serviceman and widower , Harry Brown , Michael Caine looks to avenge his best friend David Bradley 's murder by doling out his own form of justice.

As a retired man turned vigilante and taking the law into his own hands as judge , jury and executioner. As every man has a breaking point.

Harry turns the one-man vigilante when his friend is attacked , beaten and then stabbed to death in an underground passage carried out by furious band formed by some ominous punks.

Then he stalks the slums of London and takes the law into his own hands, searching vengeance on crooks, hoodlums, druggies , muggers, pimps , making the neighborhood safer and bumping off delinquents and street scum.

Meanwhile , police officers D. Alice Frampton Emily Mortimer and D. Terry Hicock Charlie Creed-Miles are investigating the deeds and Police Superintendent Childs Iain Glen orders a major arrest operation believing the recent violence is related to a gang war.

The late-night raids on the neighbourhood result in a massive riot. This interesting picture has suspense , emotion , intrigue , thrills and lots of violence.

It's certainly thrilling , though the morality may be questionable , even in this time, as the spectators were clearly on the Harry Brown's side.

Michael Caine saw a lot of himself in the character of Harry Brown, e. To herald Harry Brown as a film that every person should see is a watershed moment for the way the UK likes to portray itself.

When I was younger, I was told about what's good and bad, right and wrong and perhaps more importantly, how to deal with injustice and how not to turn a blind eye to it.

Only last week, a film with similar 'citizen turns vigilante against thugs' was banned from cinema screens in its home city of Nottingham for fear of a violent backlash and reprisals, such was the brutal, yet unsparing depiction of Nottingham's gang culture.

And the difference between that and Harry Brown is? Earlier this year, I had the honour seeing the debut film of a largely unknown award-winning filmmaker based in Stratford - the home of the Olympics - the shiny side of London.

Stick with Me directed by Bernard Kordieh is an uncompromising tale about brotherhood, confronting the viewer with the brutal reality of life in London's inner cities — very much in the mould of Harry Brown.

Judging by the hype surrounding Harry Brown and the record attendance who saw Stick with Me make its' premiere at the British Urban Film Festival last month, what is clear is that Harry Brown and similar films has a far more prominent role to play in public life, making us all think about what our roles as citizens are.

Simply put, Harry Brown is very much a film which does exactly what it says on the tin and Sir Michael is magnificent.

Watched this at a London preview screening This is an enjoyable, and often tense vigilante film. But don't look for a radical plot line or unpredictable twists because this is simply a straight forward and predictable Death Wish style vigilante story.

I'll give absolutely no credit to the screenplay writer for that. But full marks to the director for turning up the high tensions to make this still an exciting film.

Having lived in a council estate myself, I know how frightening some youngsters are and can be more terrifying than the recent flurry of zombie films.

However, this is Michael Caine's show and is a fine addition to the recent surge of old tough guys fighting back movies such as Gran Torino.

Caine was brilliant as usual. He makes the most of a pitifully typical script. That is of a widower seeking violent vengeance on the youths who killed his friend.

He played it subtle and his vigilante transition was done just right. He isn't turned into some unrealistic slick killing machine or a Rambo.

He has typical elderly obstacles such as breathing problems, slow reflexes and old bones but some of his military skills give him a chance.

There is a also a sub plot involving a female detective on his trail but it so underwritten, I just didn't care.

The actors playing the youths were very very convincing and help to root for our pensioner hero even more. So it is satisfying to see our legendary cockney actor clean up some really nasty bad guys.

Saw this film last night and wanted to applaud the British film-makers for producing this great film. It is a film which made me literally jump from my seat with excellent filmotography.

I feel this is a film well worth watching and as mentioned in the trailers, it has to be the best British film of the year.

I do not think any more British releases will be able to compete with this film. Michael Caine's acting is as usual superb and he has once again showed his professionalism in a different way.

To describe this movie as a vigilante thriller is correct but woefully inadequate because what it also does so well is to portray, with some poignancy, the sadness and despondency of an old man's life and the helplessness of the residents of an estate which is controlled by gangs who trade in violence and drugs on a daily basis.

The presence of a deteriorating council estate, a pedestrian underpass which ordinary people have to avoid for their own safety and drug deals being done without any attempt at discretion, are all too realistic, as are the random outbursts of violence which frequently target those least able to protect themselves young mothers, old people etc.

First-time director Daniel Barber's use of hand-held cameras and editing make some of the action sequences very compelling and the considered pacing of the early part of the film is successful in enabling Harry Brown's lifestyle and character to be introduced in a way which is both simple and effective.

The atmosphere of the piece is grim, bleak and pessimistic and the impressive night-time scenes play an important part in contributing to the overall mood.

Harry Brown Michael Caine is an elderly ex-marine who lives a lonely life in a decaying council estate in London. After suffering the loss of his wife who'd been in a coma for some time, he plays chess with his best friend Len David Bradley at his local pub.

Len tells Harry about the harassment he's been suffering from the youths who post dog-droppings and lit newspapers through his letter box and describes how fearful the experience has made him feel.

He shows Harry a bayonet that he carries to protect himself and his desperation has been made worse by the fact that the police are unable to provide him with any form of help or protection.

Harry's alarmed by what Len tells him and advises him not to take matters into his own hands. A short time later, Detective Alice Frampton Emily Mortimer visits Harry and informs him that Len has been killed by one of the local gangs and then, on a second visit adds that it might not be possible to make a murder charge stick because the gang could argue that they acted in self-defence as Len was carrying his bayonet.

The police interview some gang members including their leader, Noel Winters Ben Drew , but soon have to release them again.

Following Len's funeral, Harry's threatened at knife-point by a thug who tries to rob him. In this moment, his old marine training kicks in and he kills his assailant.

This is a significant turning point because since he'd completed his military service in Northern Ireland, Harry had kept his most distasteful memories buried deep inside him.

The sudden resurrection of his old skills and instincts then leads to him following a violent course of action to avenge his friend's murder.

In a movie that's full of good acting performances, the surprise package for most people is Ben Drew better known as Plan B who is brilliant as the detestable gang leader who exemplifies perfectly the way that most people see thugs like Noel Winters.

This character's only aspiration is to emulate the notoriety previously achieved by his father. He's also completely devoid of any decency, respect or concern for the victims of his actions.

Drew, who has achieved great success in the past with his soulful Smokey-esque vocals and biting political hip hop offerings has also made forays into screen writing and directing and is clearly an important emerging talent.

Emily Mortimer is very credible in her role as a police officer who is sensitive and much more tuned-in to what's going on than her superiors.

The way in which she conveys the hopelessness and weariness that she feels is quietly powerful and consistent with the overall atmosphere of the film.

Michael Caine is incredibly natural and straightforward in the way that he brings to life Harry's innate decency and dignity.

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